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#1 2017-11-07 09:01:32

Yanliliwen
juniorlid/juniormedlem
Geregistreerd: 2017-11-07
Bijdragen: 4

Waffle lugs at the outsole give

One of those rare brands to transcend fame, Nike is a label in another league. With its classic Just Do It. This sportswear brand redefines the role of gymwear and athleisure as a way of life. It started with shoes. Nike trainers, now a staple in millions of men and women's wardrobes were created by Phil Knight and Bill Bowerman in order to improve athletes' performances. From this, to a collection of classic styles featured across Nike Running, Nike Football, Nike Women, Nike ID and Nike + lines.

Nike's own Waffle lugs at the outsole give you superior traction on just about any surface you want to run without weighing you down. Your foot will be locked and loaded with super-strong, ultra-lightweight Flywire technology, so the only thing you have to worry about is how far you're ready to run. Breathable mesh upper with Flywire for strong, lightweight support. Partial bootie construction at the interior for an enhanced fit that reduces irritation. Sockliner that conforms to the shape of your foot for a customized fit.

If you're a nike shoes mens sports fan, you watched Super Bowl 51 final season then you're accustomed to the miraculous comeback by New England Patriots as they quite simply trailed the Atlanta Falcons 28-3 and stormed to win the game 34-28 inside overtime. Nike has immortalized this particular historic game by building a special pair of Air Force 1s. Known because the Nike Air Force 1 Low SB51 Comeback, Nike has honored the most comeback in Super Bowl history through two SB51 game-used projectiles and turning them into a one-of-a-kind Air Force 1 Low.

I've recently started making the shift to zero drop shoes for general walking, working and running. But I play volleyball, which involves jumping. The reason I bring up this question is the use of heels by power/oly lifters. The advantage that the heel gives them is immense. I'm curious if this advantage transfers over to jumping athletes, or if the horizontal forces (not present in power/oly lifting) at play actually put the athlete at greater risk for injury?

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